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Verizon is having some serious problems with its workers. Last August, Verizon's contract with workers of two unions which represent employees that deliver critical services, such as repairs, landline service, installation and customer service. The workers continued to work as the union worked towards a solution with the company, but the workers' patience has run out. They went on strike recently, meaning that some 39,000 people are no longer supporting the critical services mentioned above.

It sounds as though work location and job security are critical issues for workers, and there will certainly be a lot for the company and the unions to go over before a new agreement can be reached.Â

Back in 2011, a similar situation occurred with about 45,000 Verizon employees going on strike for about two weeks.

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Just to the north of us here in California, the state of Oregon and the tech company Oracle have been locked in a contract dispute over the state's healthcare website which was "botched," according to the source article. Oracle blames the state for mismanagement, while the state accuses Oracle of fraud and racketeering. The state of Oregon is asking for $6.5 billion in damages as a result of their botched healthcare website.

An interesting development in the case is that confidential documents that were sealed under court order were released to the public through a reporter. Oracle contends that the state of Oregon allowed this to happen, tipping off the reporter and helping her to publish the information. Oracle also contends that the case was already settled last year for $25 million, but that the state is lying about the deal not happening.

The details of the botched website aren't necessarily the point of this post (though they obviously are important in the grand scheme of things). For the purposes of this post, we would like to highlight that businesses can face legal action from a variety of sources and for a variety of reasons.

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Contracts are a staple in the world of business. They are entered into by individual parties, companies, subcontractors, real estate developers, and really anyone trying to see a project to its completion or attempting to garner a positive and fruitful professional partnership. However, not every contract is fulfilled in the way the parties intend it to be. Sometimes one party fails to hold up their end of the bargain, or the contract is breached in some other way that ruins the original intent of the deal.

A contract can be breached in myriad ways, so it is difficult to outline exactly what an individual or business could do when they are involved with a breach of contract. But there are a few things to expect and prepare for in all cases.

The first is that there will likely be language in that contract that dictates how a breach of contract is handled. You could abide by this contract's provisions and utilize those directions to solve your breach of contract. However, if that is unsatisfactory, you could take legal action. A lawsuit could yield compensation in the form of damages that one company requests as a result of the breach of contract.

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TrueCar is a California-based company that allows people looking for cars to shop and compare prices. The company hooks up a prospective buyer with three offers from dealers who participate in the service. One of the participating dealers, AutoNation, is considered the largest auto retailer in the country. It recently severed its ties with TrueCar over contract disputes.

The point of contention between the two companies was the fact that TrueCar wanted information regarding all of AutoNation's vehicle sales, not just the sales the car retailer received as a result of TrueCar's involvement. The Chief Executive of AutoNation said the company refuses to turn over the information because it would violate their customers' privacy rights. Moreover, he says there is no guarantee that TrueCar would not market the information to a third party.

The CEO of TrueCar says that it is simply asking the auto retailer to provide the information that TrueCar's other dealers provide. Reportedly, there are somewhere around 10,000 car franchises in its network. He says that his company terminated the relationship with AutoNation because of its refusal to provide information the company requires and also because AutoNation wanted a discount on TrueCar's fees. The California company claims that AutoNation was responsible for reporting referral information and was not giving TrueCar credit for every sale it made as a result of a consumer using the service.

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TrueCar is a California-based company that allows people looking for cars to shop and compare prices. The company hooks up a prospective buyer with three offers from dealers who participate in the service. One of the participating dealers, AutoNation, is considered the largest auto retailer in the country. It recently severed its ties with TrueCar over contract disputes.

The point of contention between the two companies was the fact that TrueCar wanted information regarding all of AutoNation's vehicle sales, not just the sales the car retailer received as a result of TrueCar's involvement. The Chief Executive of AutoNation said the company refuses to turn over the information because it would violate their customers' privacy rights. Moreover, he says there is no guarantee that TrueCar would not market the information to a third party.

The CEO of TrueCar says that it is simply asking the auto retailer to provide the information that TrueCar's other dealers provide. Reportedly, there are somewhere around 10,000 car franchises in its network. He says that his company terminated the relationship with AutoNation because of its refusal to provide information the company requires and also because AutoNation wanted a discount on TrueCar's fees. The California company claims that AutoNation was responsible for reporting referral information and was not giving TrueCar credit for every sale it made as a result of a consumer using the service.

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